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Courseware

For Colleges & Universities

Today‘s college students arrive on campus without well-honed foundational skills like information literacy and critical thinking. Creating high-quality, standards-driven instructional materials to cultivate these skills requires extensive time, staff, and technical expertise.

Information Literacy – Core offers a solution to this growing problem, providing tools for libraries to conduct formalized ACRL and AAC&U-aligned instruction, both in person and online.

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Information Literacy – Core

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HOW CAN INFORMATION LITERACY – CORE

HELP YOU & YOUR LIBRARY?

  • Teach students essential foundational skills that will help them throughout their academic and professional careers.

  • Maintain accreditation requirements around information literacy standards.

  • Simplify collaboration with faculty using in-demand instructional content that is easy to embed in course pages and LibGuides.

  • Align faculty to high-impact practices with a faculty-focused module covering topics like “Designing Effective Research Assignments.”

  • Devote more time to hands-on instruction by using multimedia to “flip the class.”

  • Assess student progress with the Credo Insights analytics tool.

Information Literacy – Health Science

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HOW CAN INFORMATION LITERACY – HEALTH SCIENCE

HELP YOU & YOUR LIBRARY?

  • Teach undergraduate and graduate students essential foundational skills that are shown to positively impact retention, GPA levels, graduation rates, and overall student success.

  • Engage users with high-quality videos and tutorials on topics of profound importance to their current studies and lifelong goals.

  • Simplify collaboration with faculty by providing instructional content that is easy to embed in learning management systems and in LibGuides.

  • Save time and resources compared to creating materials from scratch and keeping them updated.

  • Devote more time to hands-on instruction by using multimedia to “flip the class.”

  • Assess student progress and adjust your instruction strategy based on reliable evidence.

  • Maintain accreditation requirements around information literacy and critical-thinking standards.